Question: Can You Move To America If You Have A Criminal Record?

Can US Customs see my UK criminal record?

The United States authorities are able to seek details of any criminal convictions held on the Police National Computer on an individual request basis through Interpol channels.

It is not routine access to UK criminal records by the American authorities..

What countries can you get into with a criminal record?

USA[edit] The United States of America is generally very strict with criminal records, no matter how minor or how long ago it has been. … Canada[edit] Link to FAQ for criminal inadmissibility to Canada. … UK[edit] … European Union[edit] … Australia and New Zealand[edit]

Can I go to America with a criminal record?

Under US Immigration law, if you have been arrested at any time, you are required to declare the arrest when applying for a visa. … The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act does not apply to the United States visa law. Therefore, even travellers with a spent conviction are required to declare the arrest and/or conviction.

What convictions stop you entering America?

Crimes that will make you Inadmissible to the U.S.Crimes involving moral turpitude. … A controlled substance violation according to the laws and regulations of any country. … Convictions for two or more crimes for which the prison sentences totaled at least five years. … Prostitution or commercialized vice.More items…

Why can’t you go to America with a criminal record?

If you have been arrested you must declare it whether or not that arrest resulted in conviction. … A conviction could mean that you are classed as permanently ineligible to travel to the USA, however, you may be able to apply for a waiver of permanent ineligibility from the Department of Homeland Security.

How do US Immigration know if you have a criminal record?

A police certificate will display any “unspent” criminal records (cautions and convictions). If your records are “spent” your certificate will state “no live trace”. A “no live trace” record will tell the US authorities that you have at some point in time received either a caution or conviction.